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“Elite Sprint and Jump Training”: Just Fly Performance Podcast Episode 74: Joseph Coyne

Today’s guest is Joseph Coyne, exercise physiologist and sport scientist from Gold Coast, Australia.  Joseph is a well-rounded performance coach who has spent a lot of time recently in the realm of training world-class track and field sprinters and jumpers in China.

I don’t remember exactly how I came across Joseph’s work, but the quality of his training videos are first class and I know he has also had tremendous mentors in the field, such as working with Randy Huntington.  From altering the paradigm on jump mats and testing, to resisted and assisted training, as well as special strength work in the gym, I’d been really looking forward to having Joseph on this podcast for some time.

Joseph is currently the Physical Preparation Coach for the Chinese Athletics Association’s jump & sprints section; where he handles the rehabilitation and strength & power training for China’s best track & field athletes.  Many of those he worked with had world top-20 marks.  Previously, he was the Performance Manager at the Chinese Olympic Committee’s National Sports Training Centre in Beijing in the lead up to the Rio Olympics.  He also spent time as a performance manager with the Chinese Olympic committee through EXOS, and had a long-running performance clinic in Queensland.

Topics we’ll cover today are numerous, and will include sand sprinting, special strength for sprinters and jumpers, ideas on maximal strength for sprint athletes, complex training, ideas on jump training and the “maximal displacement” theory, hamstring training, and Joeseph’s work with the 1080 sprint and kBox.

Today’s episode is brought to you by SimpliFaster, supplier of high-end athletic development tools, such as the Freelap timing system, kBox, Sprint 1080, and more.

“Elite Sprint and Jump Training”: Just Fly Performance Podcast Episode 74: Joseph Coyne

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Key Points:

  • Joseph’s background as an athlete and as a coach
  • Sand sprinting for track and field sprinters
  • Strength and special strength for sprint athletes
  • Takes on maximal strength training for high end sprinters
  • When and when not to use complex training means
  • Maximal displacement as opposed to a simple RSI test in vertical jump work
  • Usage of the 1080 sprint and kBox in training sprinters and jumpers
  • Hamstring training and injury prevention

Quotes

“You can have awesome, (ideas for progression) in the weight room, but sometimes, you have a hamstring problem!”

“My non-technical training is really simple, it’s either a max strength day, or it’s a power day”

“I think instead of an RSI, look at maximal displacement at certain contact times”

“You look at (the contact times for your event) and try to maximize displacement at those contact times”

“I couldn’t do too many Nordic hamstrings with the guys because it would blow them up the back of the knee”

“One thing with all the fascial length research is that isometrics can actually shorten the fascial length which may predispose you to injury; eccentrics definitely seem to lengthen it”

“I go with a low volume approach for Nordic hamstrings; starting with 2 sets of 2”

About Joseph Coyne

Joseph CoyneJoseph Coyne is an exercise physiologist and sport scientist from Gold Coast, Australia.  He is currently the Physical Preparation Coach for the Chinese Athletics Association’s jump & sprints section; where he handles the rehabilitation and strength & power training for China’s best track & field athletes.  Previously, he was the Performance Manager at the Chinese Olympic Committee’s National Sports Training Centre in Beijing in the lead up to the Rio Olympics.  Athletes supported by this program won 34 medals (including 19 gold medals) at the 2016 Olympics.  As a speaker, Joseph has lectured at a number of international conferences including in China, United Kingdom, United States, Australia and New Zealand.

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